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Founded in 19S4 

PulDliEhed "by the students of Liberty Union Hiti;h School 
Brentv;ood, California 
Issued on the second Trida^- of each school L^onth 
Yearly subscription .,-1.25, single copy 15(^'' 

Vol. Ill I'o. 6 March 11, 192 7 



STAFF 

Editor in Chief Emily Bailejr 

Associate Editor I'ary V/att 

Busine s s I. Rnarer Cecil l7o olley 

Sol i c i t in£, I'ana{;^er Aiuor e 1 1 e Cr av/f or d 

Literary Reporter Cynthia Burroughs 

Society Reporter Mary Armstrong 

Club IJotes Reporter Ruth Ba::ter 

Exchanges Melba Cakebread 

Alumni Reporter Eleanor Townsley 

Sports Reporter Paul Halstead 

Cecil V/oollejr 

Ar t Edi tor Laur e 1 1 a I ' inta 

Associate Artists Sadie l/'ichtman 

ivrtle Vertu 
Enily Bailej?^ 

Joke Reporter Hazel Clark 

Stencil Comiiiittee Lucille Reichmuth 

- Irvin Somerhalder 
lielen Hone^^ger 
Ruth Baxter 
i;innie Pitau 
Ariorette Crawford 
Ilar^orie Veale i 

(Literary Adviser) !:isE M. E. Rowe i 

ADVISERS (Pablication Adviser) Miss E. B. Anderson | 

(Art Adviser) Miss V. J. Perov/ \ 





IX l^V:- 



THE VALUE OF GOOD READING 

"Reading is indeed to the mind as food is to the body — the 
material of ivhich its fiber is made. It is surprising to note 
the difference in the quality of mental thought which even one 
half hour's good reading each day will make" — Lilian Whiting. 

It has been truthfully stated that a good book is the best 
friend we can find, and yet in many ways there is a close sim- 
ilarity between the two. Naturally close contact with a worth 
while friend affords pleasure from the exchange of opinions, but 
more than that, there is a tendency with such an association for 
the outstanding characteristics of one to have a definite in- 
fluence upon the other. If we have chosen a friend who has had 
wide experience, who has taken advantage of every opportunity 
offered for gaining an education, and who holds a high concep- 
tion of the purpose of life — surely we shell be benefited from 
such a friendship. 

In majiy ways we derive like advantages from the careful 
study of a good book: first extensive reading furnishes a means 

of diversion; second an opportunity for greater educational de- 
velopment, and third, it is one of the chief factors in the 
building of character. 

Let us more thoroughly realize the imtDortance of these fac— 



tors which illustrate ho^v valuable is the practice of extensive j 
reading. We all experience fits of depression, and quite fre- 
quently seek to overcome this despondency by indulging in inju- 
rious forms of pleasure. If once ^ve cultivate a desire for reac5 
ing then we shall have found a key to a treasure which will af- 
ford greater joy than perhaps any other mode of diversion. Try 
picking up a book, or novel, written by a recognized author, 
when the "sun has turned his face in the other direction", and 
see what x^onders can be wrought when you find yourself whisked 
into scenes imaginative, yet realistic, where characters live 
and draw your attention because of their similarity in many re- 
spects to those with whom you associate* 

From an educational standpoint the value of a well written 
book cannot be over estimated. The enlargement of vocabulary is 
in itself a powerful asset, not only for its necessity in every 
day speech and writing, but for its value in the better under- 
standing of the material in books. After each close study of a 
book we acquire a famliarity with the more commonly used words, 
and gradually with those less frequently used, so that in the 
end reading increases in ease as our powers of understanding of 
the context grow. Proper reading will create an impulse to de- 
velop our latent powers of observation. 

Furthermore there is ar. abundance of historical and geograph- 
ical information to be received from many books which is present- 
ted in a pleasing manner, and therefore is more readily absorbed 
than when stated in the form of mere facts. Many books, espe- 
cially historical novels, reveal vivid and lasting descriptions 
of ancient countries, and even of obscure districts of our own 
country, and often traditions, as well as present day customs 
connected with them, are brought to our minds for the first 



time. Naturally the study of Txjople in such a setting and with | 
a picturesque background holds a common interest — or should. j 

And yet by far the grnatest advantage comes from the build- 
ing of chara.cter. Why is it that a well read ma,n can be so rea 
readily recognized? Perhaps he may not be apparently any better 
educated than a person who can show to advantage more brilliant- 
ly what little he knows — yet instinctively we feel the differ- 
ence. Perhaps he has discovered in books that which not every 
one may have: that through a common understanding of people and 
their traits of character which naturally influence their ac- 
tions, he has perceived the flaws in his own cha.racter, and so 
has learned the great lesson of control. Then again the well 
read man has sought and found something worth while in every 
book; he has dropped the book with a sense of having gained 
some higher thought, .some worthier purpose, and a finer outlook 
on life. For after all "Character is not only written on the 
face, expressed in conduct and language, but is sent forth as a 

thought atmosphere." 

E. B. '27 



SUCCESS TO CHAPTER 150 

Members of Chapter 150 of the California Scholarship Fed- 
eration, the Student Body is proud of you J We appreciate your 
efforts in meeting the requirements, and we realize that it has 
been only through untiring diligence that ^/'ou have been able to 
accomplish this great honor. 

Those who strive constantly and continue to do so after 
graduation, are, generally, in after years the leaders of in- 
dustry and a guiding hand to the youth of a nation. Today we 



are building our fuuurcs, and if our GtructurGs have not a firLpI 

foundation, can they be expected to stand for a lifetime? \ 

John Ruskin, a clear- thinking, clear-speaking man spoke in I 

a memorable and truthful way when he said, "Therefore, when we j 

build, let it be such work our descendants will thank us for, ■ 

and let us think, as we lay stone on stone, that a time will ! 

come when those stones will be held sacred because our hands I 

have touched them, and that men will say as they look upon the j 

labor and wrought substance of them »Seei this our fathers 

did for us ,*" 

Ruskin speaks of stones. What more are our grades than 
stones? Are they not the stepping-stones of a future? The 
California Scholarship Federation is helping those students who 
are members to climb upward to a future of Success. 

A state-wide orga.nization — it has as standards, three 
worth-while ideals— Leadership, Service, and Scholarship, and 
the members of the Federation are obliged to carry out, to the 
best of their ability, these ideals. Let us hope that in the 
future of Liberty Union High School, this new-born torch may be 
held high over head as a symbol of Leadership, Service, and 
Scholarship, and that, also in the future. Chapter 150 will have 
an ever increasing membershipo 

M. W. ^28 

CHARTER MEMBERS OF CKAPTFR 150 
CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP FEDERATION 

Madalein O'Vee.ra '27 President 

Elizabeth La^'rence '29 - Vice President 

Golda Frey '29 Secretary- Treasurer 

Eir.ily Bailey '27 
Alma Be8man'27 
Cynthia Burroughs '29 
Wilda Lavere'29 
Donner Wilder '29 
]^as.S.Jiarl^n....E. ROWR F^nnli-v A^^MR-r 







The phrase, "From rail-splitter to presic.ent," has often 
characterized our Civil War presiaent. But Lincoln's career 
die. not start at rail-splitting. It startec. in a cruce and 
tiny loe, cabin, vv'here chinks filled ivith moss could not keep 
out wind and rain. It started under his mother's loving fin- 
gers. Hother-love kindled the spirit — the spirit v.hich Toald 
some aa:' flare and lighoen the v.-orld. This over-grown 0:116. 
raw-boned lad of the Kentucky woods was a mxere child, vvhen his 
mother went out into the Grec,t Beyond, Yet through tne years, 



long, long. 


y 


ears they were, too, 


of 


suf 


cering and 


. striv 


ing, 


he remeinberea 


those teo.chings learned 


in 


the tiny 


log Cu. 


oin, 


when he had 


s 


i\. on the floor with 


his 


head in his 


mother 


's lap 


while she h 


ad 


taught him. 












X Via, 


J. 


'iOse teachings whicn 


had 


macie himx eag 


ei for 


more 


learning. 


It 


was the thought of 


his ; 


llOti' 


xei which 


buoyed 


him 


when the C-r 


e'_ ' 


b Question came, and 


it ' 


vas 


the lemeiii 


b ranee 


of 


his mother ' 


S " 


ceachings that gave 


him; his 


decision- 


-Abolition. 


Lincol 


-^, 


the man, was still 


an over- 


-grown lad 


, referred 


to by some 


as 


a " c ount ry 1 awy e r " , 


and 


spoken of as 


being 


"too 


coarse-fibr 


ed 


. " Yet, though he h 


ad 1 


ittle educati 


on and 


only 


the memory 


of 


a wonderful mother, 


he 


"'on 


the race 


while others 



faltered. ' — ■ 

Tnis tall, gaunt/ mountaineer with ill-fitting- clothes, 

and hands that seemed always in the i^ay, appealed to the very 

souls of his listeners. His voice, so.:ietimes as loi^ and 

soothing as a lYoman ' s anc at all times controlled, fell on 

the ears of his audiences like a prayer. His was a pleaaing, 

personal, yet national, cause. His heart was in his voice, and 

the hearts of his listeners were his. He bc,red his soul in his 

speeches, laia it open zo adiviiration, respect and incpirction. 

The tragic self-denial and beautiful consideration of 

nis fellow-men has mac ° "''.n -non"" -n -i iT-r^-+ -^-i -t- - -i - . 

L.cx..^ ^u.xx^Oxn im,.:Oxtal. His woras and ceeds 

uill live t:- rough the ages; yet his mother, the brave woman who 
toiled, struggled, oa^ight, ana gcve him the first of Life's 
Lessons, lies in a shallow and unpretentious grave, in Kentucky. 
Undoubtedly, though, she guided the steps of her son, until he 
lad firmly built the Altar of Freedom, .-itn its base of -other- 
love. 



liary F. Watt 
|eDIT0R'3 NOTE: Each year the Illinois Watch Company ofi.rs a 
bronze Lincoln medal as a reward to the high school pupil in an | 
accreditea high school who writes the besx short Essay on 
Abraham Lincoln. The purpose of such a contest is to increase 
knowledge and admiration of Lincoln am.ong high school studer 
of the United States. 



rnu 



me cbove essay wricten by Mary Watt was the winning essay 
from our school. 




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THE "HOmiTIE" 

Little white puffs of dust floated upward from the floor 
of the oesert. A small dark spot accompanied these puffs, 
iaii^tly visible at first, "but gradually' becoming more discerni- 
"ble. The spot developed into a hoise and rider traveling at a 
slow canter due to the intense heat of the desert. The horse, 
a splendid animal, seemed to move v/ithout apparent effort; its 
muscles flowing' sr.oothly "beneath a well groome''' chestnut hrown 
coat . 

The rider, who seemed to he part of the horse was very 
pleasing to the eye. His face was tanned a deep hronze because 
of the furnace like winds of the desert. His eyes were a 
steely blue and his hair a soft brown. He was dressed like the 
average cov/boy of the time, and a long blue barrelled Colt 
swung at his side. 

All this was visible to Sontag , v/ho , from a high crag, 
watched the rider^s progress across the floor of the desert. 

Sontag, a wanted outlav/ was very ^^ratchful, for riders did 
not ride that way once in ten years. The bad lands extended 
for miles and v/ater holes v/ere scarce. 

As the rider began to ascend the Mountain ?ange bordering 
the desert he was stopped by a challenge from a masked man. 



The man had heen hide en hohina a large granite rod: and had | 

stepped out at the rider's approach. After a fev/ minutes tall: I 

the guard from the "buzzard ^s roost" (outlaws hiding place) | 

» 

evidently seemed satisfied and let the rider go on. | 

I 
When the lone horseman of the desert had ridden a mile or ? 

I 
so farther up the slope, he sucdenly came upon a secluded cahTn^j 

The cahin v/as fairly large and the only huilding there except a 
pole shelter for the horses. The horseman's gaze was not rest- 
ing on any of these details. Ko was looking into the muzzles 
of tvrelvo different rifles trained on him hy as many mashed men. 

"An' v/ho are yuh?" questioned a tall lithe muscular 
fellow, evidently the leader. 

For ans-7or the lone horseman pulled a poster out of his 
saddle pocket. On the poster was a picture of himself and the 
following words 

FOR 

FRLD COKPEY ALI'lS "NSYADA" 

KI^IGET 6 FT. 2 III. 

Wr.I^'^HT .ABOTJT 180 LBS. 

EY3S ?LUF HAIR BROV/IT 

HOR-E SUIT RLACi: V/ITH (\') Oil LR'^T ^inu: 

ABOUT "^^IFT'^TIII HM^DS HI'^E. 

SHERIFF Ain)R:^v;s 

V/hen the handit had finished reading the poster his eyes 

seemed more friendly hchind his mask. 

"I helped one of your pals," continued the rider "out of a | 

mix up, and he told me the way hero. He's gone up the long < 

trail now." : 

The outlaws seemed satisfied and aeirood to let him stay. , 



After putting up his hors;.-, they all wont insi^^o to r»lay cards „ 
The strangor v/on her.vily until the outlav/s lost all of their 
irionoy. ITot v/illing to bo hoatcn hy a stranger thoy all v/ont 
outside to their various caches for more money. The lone horse- 
man seized his chance and poured a handful of linocl: out drops 
into their friendly Jug. 

The next morning as the sheriff loolied out of his office he 
saw several puffs of dust on the desert. They were coming to- 
ward his office d.s the cavalcade drew reign before his office 
the sheriff exclaimed, "By golly, V.^id , how did you do it?" 

The cavalcade proved to ho none other than our stranger of 

the desert, and the hand of outlaws who v/ere thoroughly tied. 

Instead of an outlaw or hank rohhor, the lone horseman was Wid 

Samuels of the mounted police. Thj poster of himiself was part 

of the scheme to capture the "bandits. Again, the "miOuntie" 

gets his man. Earcld Davis '29 

THE C0U7^^:aE OF FOB HUNTER 

Howling, v/histling dismally through the sombre forest, the 
wind with all its m^ighty force struck Bob Hunter full in the 

face. A more unexperienced man might have turno'"' >^ack in terro: 

and even one who har^ \/eath ^rod many hardships throughout his 

life might have cast a wary glance ovDrhead and predicted one 

of the heavi.^st storms he haa ev ;r seen. But was this true of 

Bob Hunter? No I he was a man I 

Bob Hunter hid, journey 3d from his small cabin to the near- 
■est tovm which was ten miles away. Ho had cxrrived safely and 
had arranged for lodgings in a small log cabin which was the 
predominant figure in the small village, for there groceries 
wore sold and one could oven buy clothes but at such a price 
that nearly everyone made his own. 

Night came and Bob listened to the grov/ing storm. Ho let 



his mind v/andor b-ick to his hut v/horo the most procious liio in 
the v/orld v;as hold. 

For V/c-oks Bob h:ir! slaved to make conditions hottor ior his 

only lovod ono who moant more to hi:.: than his ov;n lile. His | 

mind was distractod by visions oi powerful hurricanes or snow- 
lidcs demolishing his hut and the precious liie v/hich it hold. 

As the storm increased its iury. Bob became more and more 
uneasy until iin:illy he could ivait no longjrr N^t thinking oi 
his own discomiort, he plunged into the raging storm and headed ■ 
for his small ca'nin. 

Dazedly he wound his way through the maze of tangled trees 
v/hich hung grotesquely through the vivid flashes of lightning. 
Finally panting for breath and disheveled and torn, h-^ tore his 
way to the house and v/ith an anxious sigh of hon,:;, flung the 
door open. 

A happy smile spread over his scratched faced. ?here on 
the bed, contentedly snoring, was his one great love, his dog, 
"Minnie". James Watson ';.7 

VISIONS OF THE SOPHS. 

When the golden sun is melting. 
In the Durple of the night, 

There is promise oi th .' morrov;, 
That it v/ill bo fair and bright. 

So today v/e s :e the gleaming. 
Through regrets that v/e must part, 

Of the beauty of the future. 
In hopes that fill each heart. 

All the years v;e spent together 
Hlid the scenes wo love so v;ell, 

V/ill remain as sv/eetcst mem'ries 
V/rapt in j^outh's sv/ect, mystic spell. 

As v/e journey down life's pathv/ay. 
Still our thoughts v/ill oft return 

To the happy days remembGred 
V/here v/e strove life's rul^s to learn. 

IVe go forth v/ith firm endeavor 
And v/ith purpose ever ti'uc , 

And our motto is perfection 
In v/hatever we may do. 

But though lands or seas divide us, 
IVe viill ever cherish dear. 

Our beloved Liberty High, 
And her name we will rev-re. Pietro Dematei 




"I-IELODIES OF LIBERTY UNIOII" 
by Marjorie Collis 

"Sonscv's of the "^^^nderer" Bud Hill 

"Five Foot T\7o" Sadie Wi^htrnan 

"Ukelele L?dy" Elea.nor Vieira 

"Gi.ume a Lil' Kiss" Amorette Cravrford 

"My Buddy" Helena ''ecney 

"Thanx fer the Bug:y Ride" "Hank" S. 

"Mar.crie" J Gieselrna.n 

"Frer.chy" Anna 'French 

"Baby Face" Bill Bo^/jlin 

"Little but Oh My" Sadie Cooper 

"My Wild Irish Rose" Madalein O'Meara 

"I Want My Mammy" Edwin Sellers 

"I Love Me" Kenneth Bonnickson 

"(>olden Gate" Alice Lloyd 

"Cecil-(ia)" Emily Bailey 

"Ain't gonna rain no mo'" Margaret Hevey 

"Dreamy Melody" Jirnmy Watson 

"The Shiek" Harold Davis 

"Wherdja Pret Them Eyes?" M. E. R. 

RADIO BLUES 
by Fred Heidorn 

I wish I could have a treat in the radio ray. 
The people who bother me day after day i 
Why, I'd be so hap'oy that I'd <zive a shout 
If I could just pleasantly tune them all out I 

My big sister's at me from, morning till night; 
She says she is trying to make me polite. 
I know that she means well, without a.ny doubt — 
But oh, hor I rish I could just tune her out. 



April 30 



IHY T7AS OUR SCHOOL NAMED LIBERTY? 
by Eleanor Vieir- 

This is vhy: 

L-Love 
I-Initative 
B- Beauty 
E-Effort 
H- Re suit 
T- Truth 
Y- Youth 



CAN YOU IMAGINE 
"by G-race Turman 

Mr. Nash changing places v;ith Mac? 

Mr. Spindt teaching cooking? 

Miss Rov.'S teaching sho"o? 

Mr. Callaghan teaching sering? 

Miss Anderson teaching astronrrny? 

Miss Logan teaching a.igebra? 

Miss HiKgins teaching biology? 

Mr. Q-raf teaching shorthand? 

liiRS Bo'^'Tiian tee.ching cheraistry? 

MiSvC Perov.^ teaching Latin 

Conner dancing the Charleston? 

Marion L-^v.rrence studying? 

Mr. Soindt rearing sailor trousers? 

Agnes v'ith straight hair? 

Josie Garcia teaching public speaking? 

Glac^ys Sullivan as yell leader? 

Arthur ^rey pole-vaulting? 

Oliver Henas playing the "oia.no? 

Golda Erey '"'earin^c a. lonr^ cress? 

Cynthia •"ith red hair and freckles? 

James Ha.nnura talking to a girl? 

Johnny Beame six feet tall?' 

T'ilda Lave re i-'ith blond hair? 

Mr. Calla.ghan v/ith a mustache? 

Dorthothy Regester playing the saxaphone? 

If you can, it's rnore thai,n I c?=n do. 



WE SELL '-ILSON'S CANDIES 



"THE CANDY WITH A COLLEGE EDUCATION 



Brentv/ood 




California 



Sas 

of 

muz 

use 

pre 

and 

bea 

b e '^^ 



DIALOC-UE. 
by Ruth B'^.x'jcr 

"Jerry T" 
"I'm sorry." 
"Oh, very I" 
"Couldn't heir it." 
"Piffle I" 
"Forsive me." 
(Sniffle) 
"Come, Mar -2:1 e I" 
"No, never." 
"I love you." 
"Clever I" 
"I mean it." 
"Sta^e stuff." 
"No, 'it's true, " 
"Fo bluff?" 
"Sure thing." 
"Jerry I" 

SOME HUNT I 
by Irvin Soraerhalder 

W© have some hunting out here in the "Sest i^ith v/hich the 
t ca.n not com-oare. No doubt you might like to hear of some 
our hunting ezToeditions . I ^;7ent out one day v/ith my old 
zle loading rifle, but didn't hpve very good luck. I had 
d all my bullets but one, .^nc started home vithout ^ny gpme, 
tty much discouraged. Then I came to rhere the trail divided 

in one pa.th stood => mountain lion, ,?nd in the other a huge 
r. V'ith'only one bullet, ^;7hat r?R I to do? If I shot one 
st, the other vould get me. 



had to vrork f=ist. 
.+1 



I pulled out the 
can inch, stuck my knife in it with the edge 
that it v/ould plit the bullet, and fired be 
and killed both rith one bullet I But I ■-as 
knife go hurtling through the air right ove 
the limb of a tree v-ide oTDen Just ?s fifte? 
ed on it. The limb closed on their toes an 
I climbed n-j the tree, killed the birds and 
ground. In my excitement I fell out of the 
and had to r^^im around to find a ■"ay up the 
ly got home and rent to change my clothes, 
and fifty pounds of fish in my boots. 



old '"ooden rpjn rod 

towa,rd the gun, so 
tveen the t-'-o animals 
astonished to see my 
r my head and split 
n rild turkeys perch- 
d there they hung, 
threi" them to the 
tree into a river 
ba.nk. When I fin-1- 
I found one hundred 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



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f 



Prentv'ood 



California 



r/ 



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FOR 

Feoruary 12 

llacijuers.cie Ball {^-iven 
by native Sons at 
Byron I. 0. 0. F. Hall 



February 16 

Reception and card 
party given to Mrs, 
Sda Belle Little 
(Formerly Miss Fda 
Belle Hansen) by 
native D..ugliter3 at 
Byron Hall* 

February 18-19-20 

3j'V;orth Loague eonven- jILv.rch £ 
tion at Libeifjy U:".I.cn 
Hi-^;h School, B=entv;ood. 



1: "Gorn S'oar and Mason- 
ic entertainjiient in 
the American Le^,ion 
Hall at Brentv'ood, 

V. ; ideville anci enter- 
tainment x^resented ^^-j 
Antioch High School in 
jliiierican Legion at 
Antioch. 



Febriiary 2o 



February 19 

Dance azio. c-rci party 
at live 0..}- School 

Flk ' >■ Annual B 11 c t 
Auxiliary Hall in 
Antioch, 

Dance in Oakley at 
To^;vn Plall. 



February 



L.:G"Gallation of the 
C. S. F. at Liberty 
U -ion Hi_h S-ji'Ool, 
Installed by President 
and Faculty'" A6.viEer of 
Chapter 51 of Ilartinez, 



ilarch 4 



I;l'.rch 5 



Lance in Brentv;ood in 
A-icrican L'^gion H- 11 
at B.. entv;ood. 

Firemen ^s Lance in 
Arlington Hall at 
Tracy. 



native Laughters Crj.rd 
Party at 3, ron Kail. 



B..sl-:et Social given by 
K. II. IC. at Liberty 
Union Hi n School, 



'arch 12 



C".. ( P..,rty given by the 
A'-iorican Logion Auxilia- 
ry at Brentv/ood A"uxilia 
ry Hall . 

In v i t a t i na 1 Lance 
given by ]*:'r. V^. G. 
Pierce, Proprietor, at 
HobCl Los !^:danos 
Plttsbur^-. 



L;.nce ao llountaln Eous--ii 



!^rch 16 



'£.rch 19 



! '.arch -'2 6 



Schooliicuse given by 
Farm Bureau st '.omi- 
tain House District. 



Il3. ti ve Dau-'jliter ' s 
Dance in Lion'_ Club 
House at Tracy, ^'usic 
hy "The Four Horseman. 



St. Pw-triok'c Dance 
at Knights en Kail. 

"Safety First" at the 
American Legion Hall* 



V/AFFLSS 

Hc::s •:a:.g '^t^l aiid c.jgs 

TA. _ti.ljijS 
and 



Brentwood 



California 



l{}/iatfei(9) Ji^CaT^X^i l/a-pis^r: 



— ri.iL V 



^'•■;'^"^"-"',II:G i. 5:?i:CI..LTY— $1.00 ( 



Ii:CLUDII\G A BOB CUHL 



i 



Icyle Barr 



Proprietress I 






?::zrl:jss 
ciiAin)Li;R 

and 

SUPJR STAR 



Brentv/ocd 
California 



R. Co Griffith 
PrOi)rietor 



CC:3>Li:iDi?TS OF 



H<§)^e i 



io; ^ r? 



lo)ipeB "^ "^^ ®^ 



Brentwocd , Calif ornic 



TeleiDhone 26 




rictB Joan 



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T i nc 



'•^^ 



1^^ 



^o 






cc!iB..iCD r;jgcurci:s or.zR ^r^o, 000,000.00 




FR23HMIV K0T2S 

Now what have those Fresh- 
men been up to? Nothing other 
than to choose an Honor Roll 
System to encourage better 
grades among our students. 

All pupils averaging a 2 
or above without incor.Dletes 
are eligible to this list. 

Those whose names are on 
the Honor Roll this month are: 

Betty Lunch 
Theo Ella Thompson 
Alta Pickrell 
Henry Martin 
Donald Jacobson 
Jolr^nnie Beam^e 

We are hoping for a greatei 
number of students next month. 

The Freshman Cafeteria 
Sale held March 1 was a great 
success and we find that our 
bank account is growing rapidly. 

Our one day vacation a 
couDle of weeks ago (due to the 
broken electric wires) was •■' . 
greatly appreciated by the 
Freshmen for this was our first 
experience with an unexpected 
holiday. 

Geraldine Beeney 



Where? At the 
and picnic, of c 
you imagine the 
in to Marsh Cree 
•■^e went last yea 
little Freshmen? 
there and hike, 
to Byron Hot Spr 
More fun .' 



i^^ 



;-i']7imming party 
ourse. Can't 
Sophomores go- 
k to the place 
r ^^'hen vre were 

We'll eat 
then we '11 come 
ings for a swin" 



We're lead 
ber of mem.bers 
We were really 
little proud, 
are being held 
omores might co 
We would be fir 
hard to be bett 
iors. We'll tr 



ing in the nuni- 
in the C. S. F. 
surprised and a 
Yes, track-meets 
this week. Sooh- 
me in second, 
st but its so 
er than the Sen- 
y though. 
Wilda Lavere 



SOFHO"''ORF NOTES 
Oh, won't we have fun? 



JUNIOR NOTES 

"Your pep .' your peo J 
You've got it, now krep it. 
Doggone it, don't lose it: 
"Your pep I your oep J" 

With such sunny weather 
how could we Juniors do any- 
thing but make a good showing 
in the track-rDeet? Our class 
has so much peD that every once 
in a. while we shock som.eone 
rather violently ^-^ith our ex- 
cessive vim, vigor, and vital- 
ity. 

The class hasn't Riven any 
sales as yet for the good reasori 
tha.t our treasury is bountiful- 
ly supplied with hard, cold 
cash. Hurrah i 



Wg horrd our DonnieB for 
something next ycer pnd mr^/ba— 
spy Seniors, you still hpve 3 
chance for a laie'-'sll feod 1 

Thclr.r Tiohorason 

SENIOR NOTES 

After many days of I'r-ngtn^' 
discussion a. Senior Play hps 
been S3l:cted by the vl-ey corn- 
niitteo a.nd e^Dorov-d by the 
Cl-'^ss . 

The play is a lively mys- 
tery affair with a Nc" York 
background. There is plenty o 
pee and good nature throughout 
Even the severest critic will 
have a hard cii'ic finding faults 

You V, an"G to knov' 
the name, of course. I"c's one 
that can have a lot of meaning 
b-j-ind it. "A" I Intrudi:-.; ?" ■ 
is the title. 

Th": cast has been chosen 
as folloxvs: 

I/^o. HASTINGS, the housekeeper: 
Lucille Reichniuth 

ELAIP HOOVER, the adventurer: 
Wallace Regester 



DICKIE ""ALDRON, a romanticist: 
J ^ Lies '';a,tson 

rONA, the mnir': Evangeline Ven- 
turini 

HORACE VARE, the father: Don- 
ald Houston 

VIOLET VARE, the younger daugh- 
ter: Amorette Cra^-jford. 

PETER, devoted to Vi : William 
Bo"' lin 



DORA, a friend of Vi ' s : 
Armstrong 



'ary 



DAIRY FEED CHICX FEED 

MILL FEEDS 

CALF MEAL AND MIXED FEEDS 



ar 



GERALD MAYS, "Jerry from Sage 
Creek" : Cecil Woolley 

JANE, Vare's Niece: Alma 
Beam, an 



FARM IMPLEMENTS, l/l^AGONS 
HARDYJARE, GAS ENGIITES 
GENERAL B LACY SMI THING 
ALL YINDS ?mT AND PIPE ^^^ORY 
TO ORDER 
Me C0R3 ■ I CK- DEERI NG TRAC TOR S 
AERl-lOTORS WINDMILLS 



BrentT'/ood 



California 



w» \^> n 



(§>T i^n 3> 



cB in (i 



Brentwood 



CHliforni^. 



A CASH STORE 

V."ith 

CASH PRICES 

SPECIALS 
EVERY WEEK 



Brent rood 



Californi? 



Ernest ppthburn, Jan's secreta- 
ry: Delnier Wilder 

rarjory V-ire, the elder daugh- 
ter; Emily Bailey 

Play practice started Von- 
day, March 7. Everyone is 
learning his part. Viss Lor.an, 
our class tcr-cher, is directing 
the Dlay. 

The Physics Class, coir^oosc! 
wholly of Seniors, ;notored to 
Crockett on Thursdry, Ltarch 3, 
to witness the raisin;! of the 
northern span of the Carouinez 
Bridge. The class went as 
guests of I'.T. Upha::: of the Chair.-- 
b e r of Co u.x e r c e . 



th: load at the tr^ck ^venxs- 
kcep UD the old sDirit, "boys J 
Delirx-r Wilder 

3-^^71 CE CLUB 



The 


at the la 


vice Club 


The time 


the pins 


definite 


yet been 


the facul 


and it vv'i 


at the ne 



Arrorette Cra'"'ford and Evan- 

eClinc Venturini spent xhe ^-'/eck- 

end 01 February 27 and 28 in S^i^ 
Frcencisco. 

Two ir.emb rs of our class, 
Ruth Baxter and Ells'.vorth -"ells, 
attended the annual confer-nce 
of the Epworth League Alliance 
Officers held in Berkeley and 
Oakland, laet Saturday evening 
and Sund ay mo r n i n g . 

Sunday afternoon Ruth, D-v- 
id, and I.'rs. Baxter h-^ard the 
internationally celebrated 
•oianist, Rachmaninoff in San 
Francisco. 

The Seniors are still in 



subject of discussion 
st meeting of the Scr- 
'^as i''.:s constitution, 
for the a"'arding of 
s-v-;:'.s GO be rather in- 
and no conclusion has 
reached. Members of 
,ty will arrange that 
11 be made known to us 
xt miecting. 



Students, try hard to get 
into the club. It is a founda- 
tion for the C?^lifornia Scholar- 
shir) Federation. If you are in 
the Service Club, you have a 
chance for eve:: s^re^ter honors. 
You can win if you are deter- 
r.ine-d. Let's start with a dif- 
ferent and bete^'r attitude. It 
al"'ays Days .' 

■,7ilda Lavere 



vt^ni kaai^ li 



KNERAL IviERGH AI'DI SE 

QUALITY 

STORE 



Oakley 



California 



C. S. F. yOTES 
The California Scholarship 



Byron 



California 



n. F. CrUf 



FURFISKINGS 
for 

r'SN ArU BOYS 




Antioch, California 
213 G. Street phone 162 



St'^t-3'' i: 



Fed-^rrtion is r.. 

ganizrtion ^.I'hos 

fostor p Jiigh s 

pTsli\^ and g-enorr^l 

on the X)prt of the 

th;-- sccmdPTY schools of 

ornir . 



or- 



■DUrOOSC IS 'GO 

n5. ^ rd o f s cho 1-} 



str.d en i:s of 



j U. i:. 3. At this time, ho'-'^evc: 
j v.''- hr^d not y -t b-^cor;. ^ i:r-~mb-rs, 
but PTi <- p'.licrtion 'ves forni-d 
In.st y-PT during the fall soni- 
r-.stcr, and our onstitution 
c3lif- j was finally ^cc-otod by the 
j Cr dcntirls Corr^T.ittoc of the 
C. S. F. 



Heretofore, th^ro h-^s been 
e convention held e^ch ya.r to 
which each u.eirroer school sends 
delegates, but it has been re- 
cently decided that th'r; sh^ll 
be semi--nnual conventions on 
account of the growth of the 
organization, and the fact tn^^t 
accession to xho vari'^us ^arts 
of the state will oe ir.-^'e casicij t\ 
if conventions arc held of tenor. 



On F.-^bruary 35, 1^37, we 
w-^'re forrr.ally installed as 
Chapter 150 of th- Calif ernic 
Scholarship Federation by the 
faculty adviser and tho pros!-- 
dent of Chaot:r 51 of Martinez. 



The Gprin^: 
C. S. F. is 



convention ol 
to be held in 



Last year the u.ceting olacd 
IS at Stockton, and delegates j 
■re chosen from the Student 



QUALITY yiLK 



Body rt 



large, to r core sent L. . George Davis 



Brentwood 






Opoositc Brentwood Hotel 
Brentwood, California 



t & C (^ T 



© arrt 



S. N. Parsons 
Prooietor 



^ 



^^\'(S/?^ 



Oj 




BRAND 



®r ck HT ^ 



s 



fT^JS 



LU:y. SULPHUR— -APS'NATF OF L^^AD 

OIL S?:^AYS~ BORDEAUX 

NICOTINF SULPHATE— KAY80 



Brent'^'ood, Calif ':>rnia 



Fresno on itpril h. This vin.c 
tli- dclegnt'.,s to th, c invent ior 
'-^ill be chosen from th^- chart ei 
memb.-Ts th^ers -Iv.-s, end it is 
hopid thet those ^-ho ettcnd 
■^ill receive e gre.^t deel of 
ben;fit end inspiration '^hich 
vfill rnekc Cheptcr 150 en -ctivc 
force for good in this hi eh 
school. 

Cynthia Burreughs 

K. K. K. 

On Fridey evening, ^v-^rch 
4, th: K. K. K. g-ve r Besket 
Sociel. Dencinp md gf^m^-s '"ere 
the orinci-oel ."•nt^rt-'inment of 
thr evening, -ioh eusic by the 
High School Orch-~strn end Hnrr^y 
Cordue PS f:r,tures- 



The be sleets -^ror' nuctioned 
e'itheut Ccosuelties, e It ho ugh 
there seem-d to bo soi7?c sort of 
disturbencc bct-e^cn Mr. Seindt 
end yr. C-^llRghan. 

Do lie Si Ives 



GIFLS' L""A:-U^ NO^ES 

Th'-: Girls' Ler-guc is roing 
to h.-^v" r^ tr.^ck-.r -rt rsne oicnic 
on Aoril 13. ''^e thought firsts: 
of inviting -^ couele of other 
schools to it, but efter much 
discussion -'e decided to h-^vc it 
en int::r-cle-s effeir of -^ur 
Leegu"^ only. 

Eech girl is to bring her 
o'^m lunch end corn~ "Dreoered to 
tr.et herself to e good time. 



JANSSE & O'-'EA^A JAN3SE & • "EA^A - 



jAN^g- S, 0'''EA^A — ' 



The stor- -h-ro thrifty shoooers meet 
The store 'Those stock is i"ost conroletc 
With everything th.-^t's good to r^t 
For bre-^kfast, lunch, or n'.idnight treet • 

It is e pie-sure to us to be -ble to suooly the food 
thet will bring health end heepiness to the boys ^nd 
girls m our schools. They, end th-ir feth-rs end 
mothers ere elwnys -elcom- here. Cor-- in often ' 
J A N S 3 E & ' y E A ^ A 



MiiilLi^^lh lHl@a^ 






FRESK AND CURED 
e'EATS 



iy)T^7i%>^©&<l )U "WTTB fe) © T 



© "m ^ a "f? y 

BUILDING I/ATERIAL 



FREE PLAN SEP VI CI 

For 

FO:.'^ BUILDERS 



Brent'jood 



Phone 3J 



Brentwood 



Phone 6 




Well, bael-et la.ll lias 
■passed out of the lizielirht 
for another jear, to be replac- 
ed '017 tracl: and baseball. ~ 'Zut 
before forgetting basliet ball 
altogether, v/e v/ill give you 
an account of the last tv/o 
ganies of the season. 

In the iiame at Pittsburg, 
Libert:^ lost a double header 
o;^ ver^-' close scores; the 'an- 
limiteds losin{> 17 to 20, and 
the lightweights being defeat- 
ed by only one point; the score 
v;a& tied ano. three extra 



minutes had to be 
decide the affair 



-: la- 



id to 



It v;as the accurate shoot- 
ing of the Pittsburg team that 
capped the defeat of the hea 
weights. 



avy 



DIVIDE 
WIT 



'.JuKjrio 



azivill: 



JPollov/ers of Sports hear 
a lot about "fighting spirit" 
and the stuff that wins the 
games, but there are not m.any 
who are so fortuiiate as to see 
a,s good an e.::ampie as was 
given in the Danville-Liberty 
game. Trailing their opponents 
for almose the entire game, the 
Liberiiy Five pulled out of the 
rut with a„ pretty rally to tie 
the score as the linai whistle 
blew. 

During the first half, the 
gamie \Ui.s rather disappointing 
as far as clean cut action enC. 
f . St playing went. The Liberty 

seemed dead on its feet 
ruake a basket 



the first ten minutes of 
play. At hall time Liberty ".-as 
on the short end of a lb to 6 
score. 

With its fighting spirit 
aroLised, in zhe last half 
Liberty gradually increased 
its score and in the last 
minute tied the scoie with t./o 
long shoi:s by Cowan and V.'oollcy, 
An extrc. three miiniites were 
played in v/hich Danville maue 
two iiee throws and Liberty 
only one. The game v/as rough 
throughout, Cowan and Ha Is te ad 
being put out on fouls. 

In the preliminary r.ame 
the Liberty 150' s chalked up 
their only victory of the year. 



light- 



rive 

and did not 



defeating the Danville 
weights 24 to 12. 

TRACK 



Track is the leading sport 
af ill be rt 3" at present and will 
be imtil April 9, v/hen the 
county track meet ■'ill be held 
at Concord. 

In the interclass track 
meet tnere v/ere some rex'j 
promi3in.<;- men discovered who 
should develop into some valu- 
able point gainers, Tom. 
Armstrong ano. Garth Rose are 
very prom.ising milers and coach 
Spindt is veil pleased with the 
showing they m^ade in the inter- 
class meet, Leon Wells, a 
freshman, has been shov/ing up 
well in the sprints ana -./ith'a 
little training should take a 
few places in the 5 Class. 
Cecil W 1 1 e y is s ho w ing great 



form in the IiIlIx hurdles, pole 
vault and javelin, ana I] line r 
Stone is -putting the shot ana 
heaving the a i sous in greet s 
style. 

Our tiacli is in fine con- 
dition no'v, and a track meet is 
scheduled, here for Saturday, 
March IE v/ith ^xi-^Ltioch and 
Pittsburg. 

BA.Sr-5ALL 

V/arren Gedoes, the base- 
ball captain, believes in an 
earl 5- start and has his pros- 
pects out training daily. Some 
of the freshman v/ho are out for 
baseball thinl: that our captain 
is a rather harsl: old fellow 
for he puts them on the ond of 
a lawn mov/er Quite often. 
"'■Ticked" 'Varren says this is 
the best exercise for ball 

layers, anc. it also kee-ps the 
diamond in good condition. 



candidates ^^;a;. held and liar ion 
La\/rence v;as named as Manager 
of the team. He is going to 
arrange practice ^ames from novi 
until^tho opening of the season. 

A new battery and outfield 
m.ust be developed if v/e intend 
to v/in any baseball games this 
vear, and so far there are no 
Sullivan's, Griffith's or 
Zi'oh's among the candidates. 
^i7e~ should have a strong infield 
as they are all veterans of 
-last year's coam. 

At the Athletic meeting 



A meetina of the baseball 



]n>:^ SHOES 

and 
HIHE HEIAIHIHG 



F. Busb;^ 



Brentwood 






4 ^<§>®i, Klect'g k^^rlX^ih 



dealers in__ 
SELECTED lIEiTS OF ALL KIIDS 
SUGAR CUE D HALIS aID BA'^OIT 

Our ov;n make 



?. F. Bucholtz 
A. V/. Reader sen 



Telephone 7- J 

Brent'.;ood 



Jl 




\ K 




w. W. €^T 



© 



Bon llaym.er 



Oakley 



SALES 
and 

SEHVIO; 



J. L. 
Phone 



Adams 
150 



Pittsburg 
California 



held in3anviUe,J.l^rch 5 it 
'7SS ^ecidec. t.iat ^ao bcsooc.ii 
season ^ould not open uncix 
tho miadlo of April. Tnis wil 



£iYG 

pi-:'-:' 
£,ive 
more 
ina 



the traoh men a chance go 
baseball and ^vill also 
the teims a chance to get 
-oractice before the open- 
ame. The leacue al3o 
decided to us> 
baseballs sna -- - . 
Gom-Dany ^7ill give tne members 
of the winning team golc^ hedaii 
Let's bring those Medals uo 
Liberty I 



the Spalding 
;he Spalding 



Ah 






is very enthus- 
vack and baseball 
one of the enthus- 
tv/o saorts slight' 



hbh: 

nveryone 

Mastic over t 
The other day 

liasts got the . _ 

ly mixed up and slic inider the 
ta"oe at the finish of cae iOU 
^^ard dash. The time keeper ^ 
calle'^ him "safe" for a secona 
Dlace. 

One of our boys aho is 



"oing out lor Pole Vault said 
t?a^ he ^;as just proaaring fox I 
a course m aviabion. .^^h.V-T 
to oo u^ in the air gradual i^ 
and^et-ised to falling down. } 

Kr. S-..indt v;ai::ed up behindj 
one of our- sprinters and lirea , 

.is starting g^- ^^-^ '^ 
ruite a discussion as to .ne 
^^rr^ct time he v^ould have maae 
if he had been runni.xg t.ie iu J 
(yards, Mr. llasa saia Y-r^.^t 
would have made it m nothing_ 
flat. Mr. Spindt saia, 'Ho ^ e 
1 couldn't have timea mm. btop 
watches don't register m neg- 



t © 



Tit 



1 



N^ yyS 



;timatei 
for 



given 



COLIIii:.I:IAL PKIN^ 



IIG 
3r< 



r e-n^ v^ <g) ® ^ 



1 Sam Hill, Proprietor^rentwood 



T af ^ 



FOHiS, POhl^SOilS 
and 
LIIJCOLITS 



T3i3phone 7-Vi' 



F. A. Lawrence 
Proprietor 




MOTOKS & ilADIOS 



3UPPLI3S 



TS BR31rT -.OffD ^h« '^^aLL CASi: OF 
IHY TO SJIO: US Ot ^^--p^- 5L3H 



"p ®Tjl 



tw^^-:^ Ele^t^^« C^-]p*^if 



Brent WO 




BL3GTRIGAL GOilTR:' CTOHS 
od, Calif orni 



Amorette Grav/iord : 
( a Iv/ays asking, c -ac s t i ons ) , V/her ; 
does this road go? 

Bill Berlin: Diimb , it 



ativc numbors." 

Hlmer Stone, v;ho is a 
g r eat wag e r o r , said to LIr . 
pindt, "Coach, I'm going to 
uit betting." 

"ilo you -von't," roolied llr. 
S-,3inat. 

"Yes, Sir," saic lilmer, 
I'll bet -on on it." 



jstays h.erc the year 'round. 

G. F. : "Yoa'rc just won- 
derful. " 

3. F. : "Flush, I'm brohe 
tonight. " 



n 



liar jorie : "/hat mahos it 
rain? 

J: The evaporation ol 
'.vater, the air becjming super- 
saturated, thus reaching the 
iiew point, the humidity of the 
-ir oeing very low, thus 

llarjorie: Oh, let's talk 
ab out so me t h ing else. 



UjM^^&at^^ic 



L!I.CH.JIIC4l I'-Or-h 0? A 
GU^hAIJ^LED 



Byron 



fo'i /P > 



G-oiiTIi-: A L LCH C ilAIIo^ I Sx. 



BY?, on 



CALIFORNIA 




<o) 



^» 



• J . ill . rC A Ji J D L' J. D J. i . i vj X i.U-4.i< -T. or^n 



^KOV'LhS, P^lCilLhS ^ 
of 



.-r-r ,>-T-i- ->-- ^- - rj 



C.^^LIFORIIIA FRUITS AITL ^/1,C-LT-'.3^.S 



ShE Ul. Ill RF&-RL TO S^iJ- 
THS aHOWIIIG CF V^.Gx.T 



■n--:^-.A-rTr^ 



iijii.S 



l)rLi^jTv-OOx' liRA^jUn wU^u^d 

Brentv/ood Hotel Phone 45 Sanford V/arohou.^.e 

B-G V'arehouse " 44 Bixler V.'arehouse 

LIAIIT OFFICE 

405 Sansome Street 
San Froncisco, Caiiiornia 



Phone 4 5 
Ini^htsen 




The March \7inds are blow- 
ing us some rare bits of ex- 
change this month. It is a 
case of the exclusive few for 
there are not many papers, but 
they are certainly getting bet- 
ter and better. 

We "ivish to acknowledge ex- 
changes this month from: 

THE GRANTONIAN Portland, 
Oregon 

MEMO I RS- AKl'U A L Po r 1 1 a nd , 
Oregon 

SPILLED INK Emeryville, 
California 

THE ECHO Temoleton, 
California 

PROGRESS Sonoma, 
California 

HI TIMES Lincoln, 
California 

I would like to begin my 
comm.ents with the latter — going 
backwards as usual — because it 
happens to be such a splendid 
number. It is called the ath- 
letic number, but it contains 
some good m.aterial in i-he line 
of editorials, jokes and car- 
toons. Oh, it abounds in car- 
toons — a wealth of really funny 
ones. It is a. lively num.ber, 
and reflects the work and 
trouble taken by the students. 

The next paper in order of 
interest is the Sonoma High 
"Progress", a -printed newspa.oer 
of convenient size. The number 
I saw happened to be issued 
around the tim.e of Washington's 



birthday, and it told of pro- 
grams they had given. In ^• 
Sonoma they gave a big show 
March 4. They are also plan- 
ning to secure a Motion Picture 
I Machine in the near future. 

The Grantonian put out a 
very amusing Freshm.an number in 
green. There they are just en- 
rolling a new group of Froshies, 
and are having loads of fun. 
That paper is sponsoring three 
literary contests: one for 
poetry, ont> for short stories, 
and one for essays. The win- 
ning work in each group will be 
published in the paper follow- 
ing the close of each contest. 

Their Annual-Memoirs, 
"dedicated to Ulysses S. Grant," 
is one of the best I have seen. 
It is published by the January 
graduates. It contains splendid 
jliterary material, jokes, class 
will and so on, and pictures of 
all the organizations. It cer- 
tainly shows a great deal of 
painstaking labor and ha.rd work. 
We like it immensely. 

The Emeryville High, if we 
are to judge by their paper, 
"Spilled Ink", is active on all 
lines of interest — athletics, 
clubs, dramatics and music. But 
where are your jokes Emerirville? 
A few snappy jokes give a great 
deal of color to any school 
paper. 




"Aub" La.v;rence is v; or icing 
for the Shell Oil Comoany. 

•'Bud" Sullivan is working 
for the Standp.ra Oil Conj)any. 

"Bus" Logan is worhing 
for the Union Oil Comjany. 

Homer Bonnichson is /orl-:- 
ing for the General Peurole-ojii 
Oil Oonpany. 

The follo./ing attended 
the Junior ?ror:.: ICathryn _^ ^ 
Jacoby, Anna Hardy Le-vis, ?rea 
Hosie, Langley Gollis, ilma 
Dainty, Lov/ell Griffith, 
Juliet Fir 00, Julia Golden, 
Agnes Frey, "Ted" Ohmstede, 
Blanche Pl^amley, Jennie 
Coooer, George Brov/n, Leo 
Jansse, Frances Diffin, and 
Vivian Sstes. 

Langley Gollis is nov; 
.vorking in San Jose, and in- 
tends to go to Stanford later 
in the season. 

Juliet Fir.po and Julia 
Golden are ^jor::ing together 
in San Leandro. 

Blanche ?1 laley is study- 
ing music in San i^^rancisco. 

George Brovm is v/orking 
in the Banic of Byron. 

Alma Gollis visited her 
sister, Karjorie during the 
v/eekend of Jaxiuary 29. 



Lava- a Hammond aui^enaea a 
French :jlay in San Francisco^ 
jith -I grouo of members of the 
French Cluh from this school. 

Xatherine Jacohy has 
-ecentlv announced her eng:ige- 
nent to" Gordan Ralihs, They ^ 
attended the dance at Live Oa.c, 
Feb r uar y 26, 1 S 2 7 . 

On Februa.ry 22, 311 en 
Golden .and Juliette Firoo ./ere 
visitors of Sadie " nightman. 

Julia Golden has become 
engaged to Irvin Sutherland. 

Fdabelle Hansen is no^7 _ 
mi'rried to Richard Little. .e 
all ./ish her great haoL^iness. 

Agnes Frey visited her 
■oarents over 'Vashington' s 
birthday. 

Ray Houston v/as home over 
the v;ee:.:end of February 2oth. 

Leo Jansse v/ill be con- 
fined to his bed for tv;o 
months because of a rela.)se. 

Rose Reichmuth v/as in 
B-^entv/ood February 21, and she 
and Lucille ./ent to the City 
over '.:ashington's birthday. 

Lick and Alice Truett are 
em jloyed by the Dollar Steam- 
shi3 Company in San Francisco. 
Dick holds the distinction of 
being the youngest em^^loyee in 
the e^iecutive departmer.t. 



1 





P])Y^ 



P>.R 



liSH'T IV TOO 3.0? 



Old geiitlsman: Doa't vorry, j 
little flapper, ,/ou're not an^- j 
;/orse than your .grandmother WciSo 
:?'lapper: Yea, that '3 .vhat makes 
me so furious, 

''/KLL? 

Teacher: ^ive me a sentence 
i7ith the v/ord ^verr^iin.'' 
Johnn;/: ■^e-.Tore I ,:o fiahing, I 
go varrain, 

.^ 1910 :.:o:j:^l 

ZeaUiie: He./, r.lliott, ; our 

exigine'o smojiing. 

Elliott: 7ell, it's old enough 

to. 



"Yes, but there are two sides 
to flj paper too, and it makes 
a difference to the fly which 
side he chooses," 



OH 



•'vlio was it who told that 
one about the absent minded pro- 
fessor who came to teach a class 
but couldn't remember what he 
taught? 

WHAT A SILLY QUEbTION. 

Evangeline: Do you ever walk 
in your sleep at night? 
Alice: ITo , I've never been 
asleep at night. 



Had a 
ball 
•trao r 
knov/ 



Dori 
your 
.inna 



I'ueu 



line: Do you liice codfish 
a, Amorette? 

ette, (darcuutically) I don' 
I c>.2\ =:■£ attended any. 

ni^JUDJ'3 

a : /ha t ' t^ the ma 1 1 e r .7 i t h 
thumb? 
: I hit the .vrong nail. 

re are tvo sides to evo^ry 
tion,'. reminded t?ie teacher. 



A man one 
clothes to his 
be pressed and 
colored gentle 
tkeep the suit 
told his boss 
could not be c 
were certain s 
not come off. 

"Have you t 
"Yes, sah." 
"Have you t 
"Yes, sah." 
"Have you t 
"Yea, sah." 



:aot 

e gave a suit of 
colored valet to 
cleaned. The 
man wished to 
very much so he 
tha-t the suit 
leaned as there 
pots that would 



ried kerosene?" 
ried gasoline?" 
ried benezine?" 



"Have you tried amnonia?" 
"Yes, sah, an' de fit 
perfectly. 

71 3E o?Acr:s 

^ROM L. U. H. S. LIFE 
I 
"There is a very widespread in- 
terest in next season's Packard 
product because of the many 
roomers which have been afloat." 



IV 



--found on a shorthand paper. 



II 



Anna ?. : Has anyone seen my 

"Silas Marner?" 

Tony IT.: No, he's been dead for 

years. 

Ill 

Evelyn: Clocking into Mr. 
Callaghan's aquarium) Do you 
want a fish, Heed? 
Heed: IJo, there are TDlenty of 
them in this room. 



After many vain attempts to 
attract Eleanor's attention, 
Warren began kicking her foot, j 
"Don't do that," she replied, 
"it makes my tooth ache." 



Hellie: (after placing a tack ^ 

on a chair) Have a cnair, J 

Dorothy, and make yourself at ! 

home , « 

Dorothy: (without a bit of i 

surprise) I don't appreciate ! 
the joke, but I did get the 
roint. 



I/Ir. Gallaghan: "If anything 
should go vvrong in this experi- 



YISIT 



]B'U€T;iiaii,ai«'*- 



e|)a-rt-?ne-iit Sler 



Fifth & Railroad 
phone 2?. 



''i^T ®-a Hi unes 

s^3.50 A YEAR 
2 PAGE COLORED CCI.IIX 

SLIM JIM aUJ the i:elly zids 

LLiiri FEATURES- SPECIAL ARTICLES 

YOURS MISSIHG A LOT IF YOU DCilT 
^l^AD THE 3/RCiJ TIMES 

aL.VAYS BOOSTIL^G 



Pittsburg I 5y^3^ 



California 



California 



i^-^C 




mim 



^ ® TTIt ^ ft Tt Y 






Oakland 



California 



on the 
BORDEH HICT'AY 



C. B. '"ightman 



Proprietor 



ra«!nt, we and the vi/hole labora- 
tory with us might be blown sny 
high. Come closer, students, 
so that you may be better able 
to follow me. " 

sy:,i?^thy 

An old farmer wont to th'^ 
dentist to hav^ an aching molar 
removed. The operation was 
completed and the patient then 
instructed the tooth drawer to 
remove the next one. 
"It isn't necessary," explained 
the dentist "that one only 
aches in sympathy." 
"Yan't: it out, then," growled tne 
farmer, "darn such sympathy as 
that." 

IllllOCSNCS 

Little Harry C. • critically 

viewed the eggs he was sent to 

purchase. "These are not fresh, 

he told the grocer. 

"Strictly fresh, ray boy," he 

assured him. 

"No," he persisted, 

me there's a corner 

eggs and these are 



AL' e::ali?ls 

'Teacher: Give rae a sentence 
with the v/ord, "analyze". 
Sm.all Boy: I.Iy sister Anna says 
she never mc^kies love; but, oh, 
how analyze. 



CULTUr;E 

"I hear your son's at college 

"Yep." 

"How's he doing?" 

"Pretty good, I guess; he's 

taking three courses. I've 

just paid out ten dollars for 

Latixi, ten dolli-rs for Greek:, 

and a hundred dollLrs for 

Scotch." 



"Dad told 
on fresh 

all smooth. " 



A lICHCPCLIoT 

A little fellow left in charge 
of his tiny brother called out: 
"Mother, won't you please speak 
to baby? He ^ s sitting on the 
flypaper and there's a lot of 
flies waiting to get on." 



GOLIPLII/IEIJTS 
of 






4>r 



BOUHD TC 



ET T':i.I?T^TICNS 



The pastor of a colored 
church noticed a new face in 
his congregation, and after the 

service ho hurried down to 
greet the newcomer. "LIr. 
Johnson, this is the first time 



BHE^D, P 



Brentwood 



X 

>, C.iIIES ETC. 



California 



InJ. i ^'' 111 ^^ <a J ^^T^g'^ 

and 

I^OHIir^l SHOP 

Buici:- -POUTING 

G.-iES 

Atwater-Zent 
Radios 



A. V. Zieffor 



Proprietor ' By r o n 



California! 



Ilaid: You can't aob him, Hir; 
he's not up yet, 
"Prenchman: Vat you tell? T 
com' yeatorday, and you say, 



you'vs been to our church. I'm 

mighty glad to see you huro," 

LIr. Johnson replied: "Ah's got 

to como, pahson. Ah needs 

strengthenixi' . Ah's got a job I can't see hem becaube he is not 

whitewashin' a chicicen-coop and ! 

build in' a fence around a water-} 

melon patch. " 



down now you say, can't see 
heem because he is not up. Vat 
you mean? Ven will he be in ze 
middle? 



DCN'T AlTD 'TCN'T 



Omnibus l-asaonger: 
my fare. 

Conductor: I don't 
Omnibus Passenger: 
won't re-collect it 



I have paid 

recollect it 
And you won 
either. 



TAGGED 

?armer: Samanthy, do you want 
me to bring you anything from 
the city today? 
His wife: Yes, Si; you might 
bring me a few jars of that 
traffic jam I see advertised in 
the ToaDors. 



THE /'r:::]ioHi.iAii ':u,3 puzzlp^d 

A Frenchman called to see a 

friend and announced: 

"I call to see LIr. Brown." 



sahd7ich:^3 j.jtdy avo ig:^ ^:i:^ali 



ia\l@ ValU> 



1© 



H<£'f re s)4-me-Rt farmer 

Joe Rolando Brentwood 



A L:^7 CiiE Gil G;:LfT:^AL 

He was newly arrived in this 
country and was noxie too 
familiar with the use of the 
telephon^^. 3o he took: the re- 
ceiver and demanded: 
"Aye vant to talk to my wife." 
Central's voice came back: 
swettly: "Number please?" 
"Oh", he replied, perfectly 
willing to help out, "she bane 
second vun." \f^ 



n-y^ 







.^y 



®jAU Csf« 



FOP bi.^P7ICS 



Bruntwood 



California 



NUPS^ilHY STOCi: - S?r;AY l.IATGPIALS - SPRAY ;-:r:S 

;vE repre3::pt the leaders 

SILVA-3ERGTHCLDT TREES - Protect yourself against the 
apparent shortage of nursery stock by ordering NO'V 
for spring planting 
G.kLi;'GRlIIA SPRAY GHEI.IICaL CC. "GRTHC-VOLGI:" - Complete 

stock on hand HERE, 
3:-:An SPR.-^Y PUIIPS - immediate delivjry. You know the 
3EAn SPRaYER. 

D. L. "'/atson 
Engineering Brentwood Real Estate 



■■^^i.-^^ V^i^-